2ND HAND SMOKING AT MONASH UNIVERSITY SOUTH AFRICA

In July 2014, Red Drop Monash in partnership with Student Development created smoking areas at different points on the Monash University South Africa campus to reduce the amount of second hand smoking on the campus. Despite the smoking areas, students can be seen smoking in non-smoking areas and cigarettes litter can be seen on the floor after every step taken. More appalling is the fact that cigarettes can also be seen in the lecture theatre.

According to Miss Imisioluwa Johnson, the President of Red Drop Monash, the idea to implement smoking areas was very spontaneous. She said it was an idea which came up in class which their lecturer encouraged them to pursue with courage. She also said they had to carry out a lot of research on other Monash campuses and they discovered that Monash campuses had implemented a smoke free campus which inspired them to continue with the idea of developing a smoking policy for Monash South Africa.
Miss Imisi said that a lot of awareness was raised regarding the smoking areas but she said she was not disappointed with the fact that certain students are not making use of the smoking areas effectively. She said, “You can take a cattle to the stream but you can never force them to drink water”. She finally said that she hopes that students will in the near future see the danger of second hand smoking and change their life style to suit those students who do not smoke.

Effects of 2nd hand smoking

No to 2nd hand smoking
Some smokers on campus are aware that there are smoking areas but have refused to comply with the rules by choice. Mbali Nkosi, a student seen smoking by Chill Out, said she is aware of the smoking area however, she felt lazy to walk all the way to the smoking area next to the basketball court. Sam, a student also caught smoking by Chill Out said he felt that the smoking area was too far way but he would not mind going to the designated smoking area if he had to.
Miss Miracle Esosa, the Secretary of Red Drop Monash said “Currently I am not sure there is any follow up on the smoking zones on how students adhere to it but a follow up is needed to see how effective it has been on behavior change on campus”.
Craig Rowe said, at present what happens is that the security guard on duty while on patrol will ask students to comply with the smoking areas or to switch off their cigarettes. He said that to his knowledge, staff members comply with the signs except certain students. He also said that he has noticed the cigarette litter and that from student development; they will work with the Monash University South Africa Student Association (MUSASA) student advocate to look into the matter. According to him, the consequence of not adhering to the rule follows government legislation that applies not only to Monash Universities but other schools and offices around the world. He said, “We have to show diligence in the policies which we have got however, I will get back to you on the exact disciplinary procedures governing occupational health and safety”.
Mary Abioye, a non-smoker and a 3rd year student of Media and Communications expressed her disgust at the sight of cigarettes. She felt it was just very stupid for a person to be dependent on something that does not do the body any good. According to her, she does not care if the smoker harms his or herself. She only expects them to be considerate of other students who are allergic to the smell of cigarettes.
Neema, a 2nd year student of accounting and also a non-smoker, was not very pleased by the rate of smokers on the school premises. She sees it as a distraction and hopes that sometime in the near future, smoking would be banned on campus but currently, strict rules and punishment should be imposed on those smokers who do not adhere to the school’s safety and occupational rules.
Victor, the student advocate of MUSASA said, he has also observed that the numbers of smokers have increased. He said that he hasn’t looked into the issue of the smoking outside the designated areas however he would work together with student development and his other colleagues to address the situation. He is of the opinion that a heavy fine ranging from R500 to a R1000 should be levied to an offender who is not compliant with the rules regarding smoking.

Presently, no follow up has been done to ensure that non-smoking students are save from second hand smoking. Smoking is not seen as a serious problem and non-smoking students are beginning to wonder if the school really cares about their health.On the campus, there are about 12 smoking areas. There are 2 areas opposite the basketball court, 3 areas beside building F, the Africa centre, 2 areas opposite building C, 1 area in front of lecture theatre 5 and 4 in front of the gym and video lab.

smoking is a mocker
smoking is a mocker

Continue reading 2ND HAND SMOKING AT MONASH UNIVERSITY SOUTH AFRICA

2ND HAND SMOKING AT MONASH UNIVERSITY SOUTH AFRICA

In July 2014, Red Drop Monash in partnership with Student Development created smoking areas at different points on the Monash University South Africa campus to reduce the amount of second hand smoking on the campus. Despite the smoking areas, students can be seen smoking in non-smoking areas and cigarettes litter can be seen on the floor after every step taken. More appalling is the fact that cigarettes can also be seen in the lecture theatres.

According to Miss Imisioluwa Johnson, the President of Red Drop Monash, the idea to implement smoking areas was very spontaneous. She said it was an idea which came up in class which their lecturer encouraged them to pursue with courage. She also said they had to carry out a lot of research on other Monash campuses and they discovered that Monash campuses had implemented a smoke free campus which inspired them to continue with the idea of developing a smoking policy for Monash South Africa.
Miss Imisi said that a lot of awareness was raised regarding the smoking areas but she said she was not disappointed with the fact that certain students are not making use of the smoking areas effectively. She said, “You can take a cattle to the stream but you can never force them to drink water”. She finally said that she hopes that students will in the near future see the danger of second hand smoking and change their life style to suit those students who do not smoke.

Effects of second hand smoking

No to smoking

Some smokers on campus are aware that there are smoking areas but have refused to comply with the rules by choice. Mbali Nkosi, a student seen smoking by Chill Out, said she is aware of the smoking area however, she felt lazy to walk all the way to the smoking area next to the basketball court. Sam, a student also caught smoking by Chill Out said he felt that the smoking area was too far way but he would not mind going to the designated smoking area if he had to.

Miss Miracle Esosa, the Secretary of Red Drop Monash said “Currently I am not sure there is any follow up on the smoking zones on how students adhere to it but a follow up is needed to see how effective it has been on behavior change on campus”.

Craig Rowe, the head of student development said at present what happens is that the security guard on duty while on patrol will ask students to comply with the smoking areas or to switch off their cigarettes. He said that to his knowledge, staff members comply with the signs except certain students. He also said that he has noticed the cigarette litter and that from student development; they will work with the Monash University South Africa Student Association (MUSASA) student advocate to look into the matter. According to him, the consequence of not adhering to the rule follows government legislation that applies not only to Monash Universities but other schools and offices around the world. He said, “We have to show diligence in the policies which we have got however, I will get back to you on the exact disciplinary procedures governing occupational health and safety”.

Mary Abioye, a non-smoker and a 3rd year student of Media and Communications expressed her disgust at the sight of cigarettes. She felt it was just very stupid for a person to be dependent on something that does not do the body any good. According to her, she does not care if the smoker harms his or herself. She only expects them to be considerate of other students who are allergic to the smell of cigarettes.

Neema, a 2nd year student of accounting and also a non-smoker, was not very pleased by the rate of smokers on the school premises. She sees it as a distraction and hopes that sometime in the near future, smoking would be banned on campus but currently, strict rules and punishment should be imposed on those smokers who do not adhere to the school’s safety and occupational rules.

Victor, the student advocate of MUSASA said, he has also observed that the numbers of smokers have increased. He said that he hasn’t looked into the issue of the smoking outside the designated areas however he would work together with student development and his other colleagues to address the situation. He is of the opinion that a heavy fine ranging from R500 to a R1000 should be levied to an offender who is not compliant with the rules regarding smoking.

Presently, nothing is been done to ensure that non-smoking students are save from second hand smoking. Smoking is not seen as a serious problem . On the campus, there are about 11 smoking areas. There are 2 areas opposite the basketball court, 3 areas beside building F, the Africa centre, 2 areas opposite building C and 4 in front of the gym and video lab.

smoking is a mocker
smoking is a mocker

BEING DISABLED IS NOT A LIMITATION

In celebration of the World Autism Awareness Day celebration as declared by the United Nations on the 2nd of April, Monash University South Africa volunteer team went to the Gateway Village School and SARDA to volunteer to show their support to the students and adults with autism.

Autism

The day seeks to highlight the need to help improve the quality of life of children and adults who are affected by autism, so that they can lead full and meaningful lives. The Gateway village school offers vocational training such as baking, arts and craft as well as health skills to encourage the students to be productive. The volunteers had an opportunity to work along side the students in the different departments. The students get an opportunity to sell their products at the annual open market organized by the school. The profits will go to the school along with donations from sponsors and partners.

SARDA’s aim is to provide the opportunity of therapeutic and recreational horse riding for disabled people so that they might benefit in all aspects of their mental, physical and social lives. The volunteers painted the walls as well as fences and swings.

Monash University South Africa community engagement volunteers
Bakers with volunteers
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Tilda Mudenda
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Community Engagement Volunteer
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SARDA
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Volunteers
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A Job well done

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Mrs Mary Van Wyk, the teacher in charge of the health skills explained the challenges they face as teachers for the disabled. She explained that it was very important to remember that not all the students were born with a disability; she said some became disabled due to severe accidents. She also explained the need to be extremely sensitive to the need of each student as some of them cannot talk which makes it difficult for them to communicate which frustrates them and in turn makes them a little violent as a means of defending themselves from attacks. She also emphasized the fact that they have to be extremely patient. She finally called for the prayers and financial support from people with good hearts who would like to be a part of the school’s vision.
Mr Yamikani Katunga, the leader of the volunteer team said it gives them great joy to be able to give back to the community and also to show love to the children and adults suffering from autism. Mr Kani as he is fondly called encouraged all students to be a part of volunteering as it gives them an opportunity to make a difference in the lives of others.

SPREAD THE MESSAGE

On the 24th of March, 2015, Red Drop Monash, the public health club of Monash South Africa, celebrated the world Tuberculosis (TB) day with the theme ‘Stop the Spread of TB’. The event was celebrated to help raise awareness and help spread the message on the prevention, symptoms and cure for the disease which has killed a lot of people across the world.

Expand TB Unitaid
As part of the celebration, students were given little tags with the symptoms of the disease. Students also got their faces and wrists painted after which they got their picture taken. Miss Imisioluwa Johnson, the president of Red Drop Monash, explained that the symptoms of tuberculosis and cold are very similar. Therefore, it is important for people to go for medical checkup regularly especially when they feel ill. She advised that people should stop self-medications as they may end up taking the wrong drug for the wrong problem.

Berkeley world TB day flash mob

Spread the message NO TB

STM 2TAGSIMISI AND MIMI

Mental illness is not lunancy

On the 12th of March, 2015, Monash University South Africa organized its first mental awareness day as part of it showing its support for students going through one or more mental health issues such as depression, substance abuse, eating disorders among many others. The companies present were the  South African Depression and Anxiety Group (SADAG), Akeso Clinic, Phoenix House, Lifeline and the Department of Health.

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Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as we cope with life. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.

Mrs Sibanda of Phoenix explained that substance abuse is a mental health disorder. She explained that addiction or substance abuse cannot be cured however, it can be managed. She mentioned that treatment and counseling are the most effective ways of managing addictions. She said that treatment and counseling go hand in hand.

Ms Kathlin of SADAG explained insomnia as a mental health disorder.

Insomnia Video

There was an open mic session at 2 pm where the head counselor of the school alongside the experts linked stigma to mental health. They explained that having a mental health issue does not classify one as being mad. They explained that many people having a mental health problem do not want to talk about their problem because of the stigma of been labelled mad. They also expressed concerns about people not knowing the symptoms of mental illness and how to manage it before it leads to depression.

Open Mic Session

In order the combat the cases of mental illness among students, the school counselor along with the other experts brainstormed and came up with some ideas on how to help students especially with a zero tolerance for drugs.

Monash South Africa improves residence security

After the theft incident that happened at Honey Park popularly known as residence 7 of Monash University South Africa which left two people injured on the 10th of March, 2015, the Monash University South Africa residence officials have made plans to tighten security on their residences. Residence 1,2,3 and 4 have been installed with fingerprint gates to allow only recognized students access into the residence. Also, its been observed that the security guards collect the student cards of visitors upon arrival and signing in.

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One of the guards who pleaded for anonymity, explained that they collect the cards to avoid sleep overs and squatting which is against the residential rules. He also explained that collecting the student cards of visitors allow them to keep track of students who live in the residence. In residence 1,2,3, the main gate has been locked pending the time that the fingerprint gate will be fully installed. All residence 1,2,3 students now go in through the back gate of their residence where a guard is on standby.

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Another guard who also pleaded for anonymity is asking all residents to be watchful. He advised that they should watch out for any stranger on any of the residence. He also said all residents should endeavor to get their fingerprints done between Monday the 17th of March and Wednesday the 19th of March 2015 as Wednesday will be the last day for all residents to get their fingerprint done.

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Red Drop Monash celebrates world kidney day

On the 12th of March, 2015, Red Drop Monash (RDM), the public health club of Monash University South Africa celebrated the annual world kidney day for the first time. The event was held to raise awareness of the importance of the kidney to a person’s overall health and to reduce the frequency and impact of kidney diseases.

The Kidney
Miss Imisioluwa Johnson, an executive of RDM said there is little to no knowledge on the function and importance of the kidney. She also explained that there is also little knowledge on the advantage of drinking water for the kidney. She said,  “As part of a way of a way to encourage students to drink a lot of water, RDM is organizing a photo shoot with students holding glasses of water”.
As part of the celebration, there was a cake sale and Miss Miracle Esosa, another executive member of RDM said “the profit from the cake sale will go to the RDM’s South African account”. She further explained that the money will be used to advocate for health using the 3Ps which are “Prevent, Promote and Protect”.

L-R, Imisi, Miracle and Darlyntina
L-R, Imisi, Miracle and Darlyntina.

According to some other members of RDM, the main expectation from the campaign was to increase awareness of the kidney and chronic kidney diseases. Oladokun Pelumi, a senior member of the club said the celebration was a success and that the turnout of students was better than what they had anticipated.
Mary Adeoye, a Monash student said she was happy that RDM organized the celebration as she now knows how to take care of her kidney better. She also promised to drink more water in order to help her kidney saying “Health is Wealth”.

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Exercising can aid sleep

exercise  Insomnia is  a very common mental disorder among many people especially students often during the periods of examination and assignment deadlines. Insomnia is often triggered by stress and anxiety which in turn leads to fatigue. Research has shown that exercising can aid sleep. A research by The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) shows that moderate-intensity exercise like walking reduces the time it takes to fall asleep and increases the length of sleep of people with chronic insomnia compared to a night in which they do not exercise. Research also shows that vigorous aerobic exercise like running or lifting of weights do not improve sleep. Yoga is also one of the most common exercises that aid sleep.

Yoga

Although it is established that exercises aid sleep, there are many possibilities for how exercise may reduce insomnia severity. Reading a good book, eating early and sleeping in a comfortable bed can also aid sleep.

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